Monthly Archives: October 2013

Next Iteration of Approaches & Abilities

I’ve been working on trying to further flesh out my Approaches & Abilities (or A&A) method for Fate Accelerated Edition (FAE), which combines the traditional Approaches with broad skills called Abilities. I wanted to get some feedback on this next iteration before I write it up into a full rules-style format. One big change is that I gave up worrying about trying to make the Abilities list match the same 6 items that the Approaches use. I have added a few new Abilities, and clarified the descriptions of others. I also changed the Abilities so that they are all worded as adjectives. This allows them to be combined with the Approaches in a more natural way, “When I am Flashily Competent, I can…” If you want to see where this started, see this post here. Big thanks has to be given to Ed Hastings for his significant advice on this ongoing project. If you haven’t seen his Pathfinder FAE hack, which takes a similar tack on combining Approaches and Skills, go take a look at it at his site, and his many awesome sample characters he’s posted. This list of Abilities may require some mild tweaking to properly capture the focus and flavor of particular settings, but I feel like this is getting close to universal.

For a quick recap, here’s how it works:

At creation, Characters distribute a +2/+1/+1 pyramid among the 6 Approaches, and then do the same among the Abilities. When they perform an action, they describe a combination of both Approach and Ability that is appropriate to the action being taken. This means that for a character’s best Ability and best Approach combination, they get a maximum of +4 (just like in Fate Core). For other combinations, the character gets anywhere from +3 to +0, depending on the combination of Approach and Ability. The use of this blended method retains the narrative brilliance and broad competence that traditional Approaches provide in FAE, while grounding characters in certain competencies, regardless of the Approach they can appropriately use in that situation.

Approaches

Careful – A Careful action is when you pay close attention to detail and take your time to do the job right. Lining up a long-range arrow shot. Attentively standing watch. Disarming a bank’s alarm system.
Clever – A Clever action requires that you think fast, solve problems, or account for complex variables. Finding the weakness in an enemy swordsman’s style. Finding the weak point in a fortress wall. Fixing a computer.
Flashy – A Flashy action draws attention to you; it’s full of style and panache. Delivering an inspiring speech to your army. Embarrassing your opponent in a duel. Producing a magical fireworks display.
Forceful – A Forceful action isn’t subtle—it’s brute strength. Wrestling a bear. Staring down a thug. Casting a big, powerful magic spell.
Quick – A Quick action requires that you move quickly and with dexterity. Dodging an arrow. Getting in the first punch. Disarming a bomb as it ticks 3… 2… 1…
Sneaky – A Sneaky action is done with an emphasis on misdirection, stealth, or deceit. Talking your way out of getting arrested. Picking a pocket. Feinting in a sword fight.

Abilities

Athletic – Your ability to control your body. This includes acts of strength, agility, and endurance, any sort of movement actions, but also includes more niche applications, like stealth. Approaches heavily alter the style of these actions. A high score reflects broad physical prowess, while stunts define specific areas of virtuosity, such as raw strength, acrobatics, speed, stealth, wrestling, etc.

Combative – Your ability to fight, whether hand to hand, or with melee or ranged weapons. Approaches alter the style of your action. A high score reflects a broad ability to hurt others in any situation, while stunts define areas of training or talent, such as kung-fu, brawling, weapon styles, shooting, etc.

Competent – Your ability at what are often viewed as commonplace skills and knowledges for your setting, such as crafts, mechanics (relative to the settings technology level), common sense, education, driving, piloting, or riding. A high score in this Ability reflects being skillful in many broad areas. Even without a bonus in this ability, stunts can be used to reflect less commonplace areas of specialty, such as burglary, academia, occult lore, computer hacking, stunt driving, tracking, etc.

Investigative – Your ability to find out information, about things, people, scenes, or anything. The Approach establishes the style of your discovery. A high score reflects a broad ability to discover information in any situation, while stunts reflect a specific talent for a type of investigation, such as passive awareness, forensics, research, empathy, etc.

Social – Your ability to influence and interact with people, and generally get them to do what you want. Different Approaches alter the style of the influence or manipulation. A high score reflects a broad ability to influence others in any situation, while stunts reflect specific areas of talent, such as intimidation, deception, fast talk, diplomatic arguments, etc.

Willful – Your ability to withstand mental punishment, and your force of will. Also a measure of your personal discipline or conviction. Because this stat is more “narrow” than the others, it can be empowered for Extra’s like Magic, Psionics, etc, with nothing more than an aspect for permission. Without such an aspect, this Ability generally can’t be used to Attack, but it can be used for the other action types when appropriate. Stunts designate specialties within that area, or an exceptional mental fortitude.

Worldly – Your ability to leverage your influence, connections and resources to make things happen in the world. This can take the form of favors, wealth, investments, contacts, street savvy. Stunts reflect specific areas of advantage, while a high score reflects a broad network of various resources one can leverage.

Advancement

When a character advances through appropriate milestones, they can either add a point to an Ability (getting better at all applications of that Ability, regardless of the Approach used) or an Approach (getting better at all applications of that Approach, regardless of the Ability used).

I’d appreciate any feedback you have on this latest iteration.

-Razorstorm

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The Adventures of Scarlet VonRosen

So I finally got my wife to give Fate a try with me, using the lure of reviving her favorite character ever, Scarlet VonRosen, the flamboyant, fast-talking, swashbuckling she-pirate. I decided to use Gaedren Lamm and his waterfront headquarters from Pathfinder’s adventure Edge of Anarchy. This was mainly because I was rushed to whip something together very quickly, and I didn’t really have time to build anything fancier, not to mention that I tend to feel overwhelmed by world-building. I might be able to engage my wife in collaborative world-building (which she’s actually really good at…) later when she’s more invested in the system, but this session was all about convincing her that she would, in fact, enjoy this Fate thing I keep talking about. This will be part adventure journal entry, part reflection. I hope at least one of those parts is interesting to you.

Game Reflections

I’ll do this part first, since it’ll be shorter. We played this using the Approaches & Abilities Method that I’ve been exploring, and overall we both had a lot of fun. We had some really good discussion about this particular element that I will save for another post dedicated to that topic.

It played fast, almost too fast for me to manage, to be honest. I realized that I had the same “hanging on by the skin of my teeth” feeling during my Night of the Ghoul scenario, so it wasn’t particular to just this session. I need to slow down just a little and keep my bearings. Things were extremely heroic and exciting, and my wife seemed very satisfied with her heroine, so I guess it was a victory from that standpoint. In my rush to keep things moving, I totally missed some stuff, both mechanically and in terms of obstacles and opportunities.

So here’s the part where I beat myself up over stuff I need to do better:

I didn’t pay good attention to opportunities for compels, so I don’t think she really got a feeling for the Fate Point economy. I didn’t throw nearly enough complication or drama in her way. She got a clear understanding of how Attack/Defend actions work, but I never got to actually land a hit on her, and any attacks she made were effective enough to remove opponents outright. So we didn’t really get into stress and consequences at all. Pretty much everything else was a simple Overcome or a contest, so I didn’t really showcase Create Advantage other than the single instance of the thug grappling her. So next time we play, I really want to make a point of clearly illustrating how those things work. Finally, in retrospect I really could have handled her social sparring as conflicts with stress being inflicted.

So I guess it’s not so bad that I was able to have a very fun and exciting first session where we covered some of the core elements, and my player is excited to play again. If I can ensure that next session introduces those other elements, I’ll feel a lot better. If you’re running your first game soon, those are a few pitfalls to keep in mind.

Scarlet Gets Herself into Trouble

So we began with a fairly simple hook. Scarlet is “All Dressed Up, with No Ship to Sail” and her primary goal is to get herself into a new ship! The night before, she spent the evening listening to a drunken adventurer talking about how he and his friend had recovered an amazing map to hidden treasure on their last adventure. The map was actually carved into a human skull, and if you placed a candle into the skull, it projected the map onto the ceiling. Unfortunately, he and his friend had gotten mugged by Gaedren Lamm’s thugs. They took all their stuff, and killed his friend. Scarlet was talking to the poor guy about stealing it back from Lamm, but unfortunately he got severely beat up in a bar-brawl that night.

Scarlet spent the next day casing Gaedren Lamm’s headquarters, watching people come and go through the day, until she had a sense of what she might be dealing with. She then proceeded to do something I totally did not expect. She went up to the front door, and KNOCKED! She then proceeds to socially overwhelm the poor brute answering the door with some story about her being Gaedren’s cousin (she took to calling him “Gaedy”, it was great!). It was two-parts fast talk, one part bulldozer. The poor sucker didn’t have a chance, and proceeded to escort her right to the crime boss himself!

When she got face to face with Gaedren, she kept the act up, kept insisting that she was Gaedren’s cousin right to his face, which had the scrawny old cuss almost as confused as his thug. He wasn’t buying it for one second though, and ordered the thug to grab her. He grabbed hold of her, and she proceeded to kick him in the balls. Some other goons came to his aid, but not before she quickly rushed Gaedren, stuffed a handkerchief in his mouth, and straddled him on his crime-lord power-chair (which he’d been sitting in this whole time) with a concealed knife at his throat. His pathetic attempts to buck her off just looked like pelvic thrusts to the goons who proceeded to rush in only to see them apparently up to some “naughty business,” and left them alone (dragging the one she kicked out with them). She then got off, and started offering Lamm a “business arrangement” to which his response was to quickly grab a knife stowed in his drawer and throw it at her, which she deflected with her cutlass, knocking it into the water hole in the center of Gaedran’s office. He then made a dash for the door, but she beat him there, and thumped him hard on the back of the head with her pommel, knocking him out (spending a fate point to push the stress way up).

She then trussed him up, dangling him from the chain over the water hole in his office where he often does the same to prisoners (letting his pet crocodile swimming below terrorize them). She then found his chambers, busted open the footlocker in there, and found what she was looking for. She took the loot, and escaped onto an outdoor walkway leading back up to the street level. Before she could reach the street, Gaedren’s lieutenant, Yargin, blocked her way and was ready for a fight. She managed to strike a fearsome dueling pose, and convince him that he really didn’t want to tangle with her.

So she got away with the loot, the carved skull in particular, without spilling a drop of blood! She was pretty proud of that.

Here are some threads that I can use going forward:

  • She waltzed right into the headquarters of a very dangerous crime lord, and humiliated him. Gaedren and his crew are all still alive, and have good reason to come after her for revenge.
  • She now has the skull-map. With it she can draw a crew and a ship (not her own…)
  • She now has the skull-map. Surely some other party would be interested in taking it from her.
  • She also picked up a Harrow deck in the loot, which I might decide is haunted by it’s owner’s spirit (exactly as is done during the Curse of the Crimson Throne adventure path).
  • She is an infamous pirate, so surely some lawman would love to arrest her.
  • She lost her old ship when her crew mutinied, so it would be awfully interesting to run into some of her old crew.

Also – I’m kind of operating on the assumption that she is currently in Korvosa, in the Golarion setting, but I haven’t actually said anything to nail that down, so if I want to snag another location, I still could very easily.

I hope this was enjoyable, and I welcome any thoughts or suggestions.

-Razorstorm


FAE PC’s and NPC’s from Night of the Ghoul

I recently posted about my awesome game night where I played a Fate Accelerated Edition (FAE) conversion of Night of the Ghoul with my buddies Michael and Caleb from DnD Academy. It was my first time really getting to GM a game using the FAE rules, and we had a really fun time. I wanted to share the PC’s that they played, and a few major NPC’s that I prepared for it.

The PC’s

First of all, we have our heroes. Peter Flynn was a middle-aged college professor and cricket coach turned monster hunter when his family was eaten by ghouls. Mason, aka “Ace”, was a college all-star cricket player who followed Flynn into a double-life of monster hunting. They were one part Sam & Dean, two parts Buffy & Giles.

Peter Flynn

High Concept: Professor who lost his family to ghouls
Trouble: Drinking away the nightmares
I know I read that somewhere…
Ghouls killed my wife
Approaches
Careful +1
Clever +3
Flashy +0
Forceful +2
Quick +2
Sneaky +1
Stunts:
My Journal of Nightmares – Because I have done so much research into monsters, when I Cleverly Create Advantage to exploit or identify somethings weakness, I get one additional free invocation.I can tell a story – Because I’m good at weaving a complete and compelling persona, I gain a +2 to Cleverly Overcome Obstacles in social situations when I have time to build a complete story.
Third stunt never filled in during play.

Mason aka “Ace”

High Concept: All-star cricket player & monster hunter
Trouble: Caught between two worlds 
My badass skateboard!
Approaches

Careful +1
Clever +1
Flashy +2
Forceful +2
Quick +3
Sneaky +0
Stunts: 

Offensive Return – Because I’m an all-star competitor, I gain +2 to Quickly attack in response to an enemy rushing me.

Skateboard Stunting – Because I’m a badass skateboarder, I gain a + 2 to Flashily Overcome obstacles while skateboarding.
Quick Cover – Because I keep having to make up cover stories in our work, I gain +2 to Quickly Overcome obstacles in deceptive social situations where I’m only interacting with people for a brief moment or two.

The NPC’s

There were three major NPC’s that our hero’s dealt with during this scenario. Reverend Jonathan Hardy runs the church where the body was dug up (which kicked off the whole scenario). His purpose was largely to serve as an exposition engine in a social investigation scene. Big Al is a drug dealing gangster that the PC’s shook up to get info about some local hoodlums. Ace stumbled into his aspect “No one calls me Fat Albert!” quite by accident, which served to escalate the scene quite quickly. He went down very quickly against the two PC’s. That conflict could have been more challenging, but they succeeded in scaring off his goons immediately after taking him out, so it ended up being pretty abrupt. Finally, Bill Chester is the subject of the entire scenario. The hero’s were on his trail thinking he was a ghoul, but he turns out to be a very mortal man suffering from severe mental illness, who thought he had turned into an undead. He lasted for a few rounds against the PC’s in a brawl that took place in a sewer tunnel before conceeding. Giving him a “Good at” related to defense helped his survivability quite a lot.  I totally forgot to spend any of my GM Fate Points, which would have served to make either of the conflicts more challenging.

Reverend Jonathan Hardy

   I can’t take much more of this.
     Committed to protecting the church’s good name.
     Good at (+2): Preaching, Debating
     Bad at (-2): Lying, Fighting

Big Al 

     No one messes on my turf!
     Cash is king
     No one calls me Fat Albert!
     Good at (+2): Fighting, staredowns
     Bad at (-2): Running, Resisting luxury     
     Stress: 1
 

Thugs (Mooks)

     Big Al’s the boss
     I don’t get paid enough for this
     Good at (+2): Fighting, Running
     Bad at (-2): Polite discussion, lying
     Stress: 0

Bill Chester

     Life is nothing but Death
     I’m becoming undead
     So hungry!
     The light, it burns!!!!
     Good at (+2): taking a hit, sneaking around, being scary, biting
     Bad at (-2): lucid conversation
     Stress: 2

A&A Method – Mental abilities – Simon Baltar

NOTE – I’ve updated this character in a newer post.

I’ve been getting a lot of great feedback about this Approaches & Abilities method (now being called the A&A Method). I have to give a huge thanks to the folks at the Fate Core G+ community, and Ed Hastings in particular, for the awesome discussion. I continue to have heartburn around the topic of a mental Ability in my model.

In my original model, I wanted an ability to represent someone’s cerebral power. Their will, their focus, their mental strength, their power to analyze. It wasn’t really Scholarship or Lore, because I liked the idea of treating knowledge the way FAE usually does – by simply deciding whether it’s appropriate for a character to know that piece of information or not, based on their Aspects. It also wasn’t research, because that fit very nicely into Discovery (which I think I’m renaming to Investigation). This left it feeling very much like a passive Ability, used for nothing but defense, unless a character was going to use it as the foundation for something like magic, psionics, etc. A purely passive Ability just doesn’t seem to earn it’s keep in a game like Fate, which is all about proactive and competent heroes. So this becomes an Ability that has no real purpose except for certain characters with special abilities. But for those characters, it feels really appropriate…
In this G+ discussion thread it was suggested to change it to Reason, representing a characters ability to solve problems, puzzles, stuff like that. In this G+ discussion thread it was suggested to perhaps change it to Discerning, representing a characters ability to make judgments & conclusions, evaluations and insights. As we tried cross-combining it with the 6 Approaches, it works better than Reason does, but it starts to step on the toes of Investigation. Maybe that’s not a big deal. Both of these make sense, but I still haven’t quite felt right about either, and the frustration was highlighted as I tried to convert this 13th Age character below. I really like the use of Will in this character’s build. It feels very right. But Will and Reason just seem VERY different, and Reason doesn’t feel at all right for the purposes of this character.  I’m starting to wonder if there’s a different way to handle this, whole Abilities list, but that’s the subject of another post… So I’m not really sure what to do with this mental Ability. I feel it’s needed, but I’m honestly not sure how to handle it. What do YOU think? In the meantime, enjoy Simon Baltar! He’s an Umbral Inquisitor, a special police of wizards focusing on hunting down dark occult criminals in the Empire. Very similar in concept to Aurors from Harry Potter or Cursors from Codex Alera, by Jim Butcher. I’m currently playing him in a PbP game of 13th Age.
 

Simon Baltar

High Concept: Umbral Inquisitor Detective

Trouble: Can’t Stop When I’m On to Something
Raised by the Glitterhaegen Mean-Streets
A Loyal Servant
Graduated from the Academae with Flying Colors
Approaches
Careful +2
Clever
Flashy
Forceful +1
Quick
Sneaky +1
 
Abilities
Athletics +1
Combat
Investigation +2
Reason/Will +1
Socialize
Technology
 
Stunts:
Occult Forensics – Because I am a highly trained magical investigator, I get a +2 when Carefully using Investigation to study a scene for clues. In addition to mundane clues, this also allows him to perceive magical paraphernalia, signatures, residues, and auras.
 
Abjuration – Because I specialized in Abjuration magic at the Academae, I get a +2 when I Carefully use Will to Defend against physical and magical attacks.
 
Evocation (-2) – Because I studied combat magic at the Academae, I get a +2 when I Forcefully use Will to Attack or Create Advantage with magical forces.

FAE METHOD

Approaches
Careful +3
Clever
Flashy
Forceful +2
Quick
Sneaky +2

FATE CORE METHOD

Skills
Investigate +4
Will +3
Lore +3
Stealth +2
Notice +2
Athletics +2
Deceive +1
Burglary +1
Forceful +1
Provoke +1
 

Night of the Ghoul – Quick FAE one-shot

I mentioned in a recent post, “Fate takes all my money.”  that I had started playing through a FAE conversion of a one-shot adventure called Night of the Ghoul. I got to play with my twitter buddies Michael and Caleb of DnD Academy. Tonight we got to finish that adventure. Short version: We had a blast! The game was fast and extremely fun, and naturally lead to some wild and pulpy action scenes. We played over Roll20.net, which I highly recommend!
Night of the Ghoul was originally written by Grant Erswell as a World of Darkness introductory adventure. It was delightfully easy to convert it for use as a FAE/Fate adventure. In our first session, we took about 20 minutes to do some quick character building. Our heroes were Peter Flynn, a middle-aged college professor and cricket coach turned monster hunter when his family was eaten by ghouls, and Mason, aka “Ace”, a college all-star cricket player who followed Flynn into a double-life of monster hunting. They were one part Sam & Dean, two parts Buffy & Giles. We used the quick character creation as presented in FAE, where you just come up with the essentials (High Concept, Trouble, one other aspect, Approaches, one stunt) and then started playing. From just that simple start, we had colorful cricket-bat-wielding characters that everyone was excited about, and started playing. Additional elements, like each characters approach to cover stories, were discovered and added during play.

We started out with them getting tipped off by a suspicious newspaper article about a freshly buried body being exhumed from church graveyard, supposedly by “animals.” This immediately set off Flynn’s “ghoul-alarms” and they did some clever investigating. This led to some great starting social scenes at a police department, and then with a Reverend at the church where the body was disturbed. That led to a great great fight scene with a drug dealer named Big Al, where they hilariously stumbled into the aspect I’d built for him “No one calls me Fat Albert!”. Mason slammed the drug dealer with their van door, while hopped out of the van door brandishing his bat and layed him low, scaring away his thugs.

This led to a stake-out at a convenience store with an clerk who bore a startling resemblance to Apu, which was great fun for all.

When their targets, some trouble-making teens, showed up, I had the perfect chance for a compel on Mason’s Trouble of being stuck between worlds, and had his girlfriend call his cell phone and demand his attention at the absolute worst moment. The next scene led to Mason hanging onto their car bumper while skate-boarding, a la Marty McFly, in a sort-of car chase. This gave Mason the chance to really shine and we were all laughing our heads off.

There were a couple investigation rabbit-holes we would have kinda liked to explore, but we were limited on time, so I steered them in the right direction, which led to our final encounter with the “fake-ghoul” of the story, Bill Chester, in a cramped tunnel. I compelled Flynn’s hatred of ghouls to cause him to charge ahead into the lair throwing all caution to the wind, and basically begging to get ambushed, which I was happy to oblige. Flynn quickly realized that Bill wasn’t a ghoul at all, but they still had to subdue the wild man before he took a bite out of Mason. It ended with them hogtying him with zip-ties, and calling in an anonymous tip to the police, and a heart-warming epilogue where they learned the guy got the mental health treatment that he so desperately needed.
I feel like we got a really good feel for how FAE plays. I really enjoyed DMing it. There were a lot of cases where I simply didn’t ask for rolls (investigation, knowledges, etc), and just gave them the info and kept moving. When rolls were needed, the system felt extremely easy to manage and adjudicate. The characters were very easy to latch onto. Combats were fast and fun, and lent themselves to very exciting descriptions. The use of FAE’s Approaches constantly kept me asking them, “Tell me what you’re doing, and HOW you’re doing it.” Things were easy and fun. But we did have some mixed feelings about Approaches. Things felt fast and loose, but they also felt fast and loose. Next time we play we’re going to try out the Approaches & Abilities method that I’ve been exploring lately, and see how that feels. Who knows, we may decide that we like the original Approaches method better. I certainly had fun with them.
All in all – GMing with the FAE system was delightful. It felt extremely liberating to not worry so much about whether things were possible, but to instead focus on how entertaining they could be for all involved.
Next week I’ll post their PC’s and several of the NPC’s I statted up, just for illustration purposes.
-Razorstorm

Approaches & Abilites – Shane Lyonin

Here is another sample character made using the blended method of Approaches and Abilities that I proposed in this post here.

Shane is a character I built for a Pathfinder game of Curse of the Crimson Throne, but never really got to use. But I still really like the concept. I actually like him better in Fate terms, because his motivations and drama get highlighted, which are much more interesting than an urban ranger build. I also really like the idea of a bounty hunter focusing on bodily tackling people, rather than attacking them with weapons, because he wants them alive. It just doesn’t work very well in most RPG’s. But here, he can be a lean, mean tackling machine!

So, here are the questions I’d like you to consider as you judge this method in action:

  • Is it more immediately obvious what this character is good at then the standard FAE method?
  • Is it easy to understand?
  • Does it make you think about how you’d creatively combine the Approaches & Abilities to do cool stuff?
  • Does anything feel “out of place” in the genre?

Shane Lyonin

High Concept: Relentless Bounty Hunter
Trouble: Dismissed from the Griffin Guard for murder I didn’t commit
Never trust the system
Take Matters into Your Own Hands
Built for Trouble

Approaches
Careful +1
Clever
Flashy
Forceful +2
Quick
Sneaky +1

 

Abilities
Athletics +1
Combat +1
Investigation +2
Reason
Socialize
Technology

 

Stunts
Take ‘Em to the Ground! – Gain a +2 when Forcefully using Athletics to Create an Advantage related to grappling or wrestling

That’s Bullshit! – Gain +2 when Forcefully using Discovery to Defend against attempts to deceive you.

Knock ‘Em out! – Once per scene, when you force an opponent to take a consequence, you can spend a Fate Point to increase the consequence’s severity. If your opponent was already going to take a severe consequence, he must either take a severe consequence and a second consequence, or be taken out.

Refresh: 3

 

FAE METHOD

Approaches
Careful +2
Clever +1
Flashy
Forceful +3
Quick +1
Sneaky +2

FATE CORE METHOD

Skills
Physique +4
Fight +3
Investigate +3
Athletics +2
Notice +2
Will +2
Provoke +1
Stealth +1
Deceive +1
Burglary +1


Approaches & Abilities – Scarlet VonRosen

Here is another sample character made using the blended method of Approaches and Abilities that I proposed in this post here.

This character calls for some special introduction and disclaimers. This is a conversion of my wife’s favorite D&D character. EVER. So whenever I pick up a new system, I always convert her to see how well it accommodates a lightly armored flashy finesse swashbuckling fighter-type.

She very seriously almost didn’t let me post this one. She is very protective of Scarlet. “That is MY character! Someone will steal her!” So I before I share Scarlet, I have to tell you that she is my wife’s, @Lahruna on twitter, Intellectual Property. If you steal her for your own campaign, she may just hunt you down and kill you. You have been warned.

So, here are the questions I’d like you to consider as you judge this method in action:

  • Is it more immediately obvious what this character is good at then the standard FAE method?
  • Is it easy to understand?
  • Does it make you think about how you’d creatively combine the Approaches & Abilities to do cool stuff?
  • Does anything feel “out of place” in the genre?

Scarlet VonRosen

High Concept: Infamous Swashbuckling Captain of the Scarlet Corsairs

Trouble: Act First, Think Later
Crazy like a Fox
All Dressed Up and No Ship to Sail
Louder, Faster, Funnier, and ALWAYS with glitter!

 

Approaches

Careful
Clever +1
Flashy +2
Forceful
Quick
Sneaky +1

 

Abilities

Athletics +1
Combat +2
Investigation
Reason
Socialize +1
Technology

Stunts

Shipmaster – Gain +2 to any rolls related to the operation of a ship or the coordination of it’s crew

Showy Swashbuckler – Gain +2 when Flashily using Athletics to Create Advantage against an opponent as long as it involves flashy acrobatics.

Riposte – If you succeed with style on a Flashy Combat Defense, you can choose to inflict a 2-shift hit rather than take a boost.

Fast Talk – Gain a +2 when Sneakily Socializing to Overcome obstacles as long as the situation does not involved more than a few sentences before blowing past them.

Refresh: 2

FAE METHOD

Approaches
Careful
Clever +2
Flashy +3
Forceful +1
Quick +1
Sneaky +2

 

FATE CORE METHOD

Skills
Fight +4
Deceive +3
Athletics +3
Rapport +2
Burglary +2
Provoke +2
Drive +1
Stealth +1
Physique +1
Shoot +1